FUSION TRAINING SYSTEM

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Post Workout Meal FAQ

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day for all individuals. For competitive athletes, I believe a proper post-workout meal can be the difference between training success and failure.

 

Q: What is the purpose of the post-workout meal?
A: There are two goals of the post-workout meal.
Goal No. 1: To help the muscles recover from an energy standpoint. During a workout, your body uses its stored energy to perform exercises, and this energy needs to be replaced as soon as possible.
Goal No. 2: To help "build" muscle. Your muscles break down during workouts, and they need to be rebuilt in order to see positive results.

  

Q: What is the purpose of the post-workout meal?
A: There are two goals of the post-workout meal.
Goal No. 1: To help the muscles recover from an energy standpoint. During a workout, your body uses its stored energy to perform exercises, and this energy needs to be replaced as soon as possible.
Goal No. 2: To help "build" muscle. Your muscles break down during workouts, and they need to be rebuilt in order to see positive results.

 

Q: What should athletes eat for a post-workout meal?
A: To accomplish Goal No. 1 (replenish your energy), you need to eat or drink carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (see table). These foods aid in the production of glycogen, which acts as fuel for your muscles.
To accomplish Goal No. 2 (build muscle), you must consume a high-quality protein. Protein will help in the recovery and rebuilding of the muscle tissue.

 

Q: How soon after a workout should an athlete eat?
A: Timing is critical. The faster the body is replenished with high glycemic carbohydrates, the better. Carbohydrates should be eaten within 30 minutes of a workout. This will allow the body to achieve maximum absorption when circulation is at its highest, and nutrients move about the body more easily.
One hour after a workout, you should consume some type of high-quality protein. At this time, your body will be looking for protein to repair the muscle damage caused by the workout.

Q: What foods should athletes stay away from in the post-workout meal?
A: Foods to avoid are those with a high fiber or high fat content. These types of foods will slow the absorption of the necessary carbohydrates needed to replenish the fuel stores in the muscles.

Q: What should the breakdown between carbs and protein be in the meal?
A: The actual amount of carbohydrates is based on your body weight, but as a rule of thumb, it is best to get approximately 50 grams of carbohydrates.

As for protein, the general rule is about .5 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight. So, for a 180-pound athlete, this means approximately 41 grams of protein (41 grams of protein = (180 lbs./ 2.2 kg) x .5.) It is this combination that is most beneficial in repairing and building muscle.